Tag Archives: motivation

Shatrujeet Nath

Already on the other side – A peptalk by Shatrujeet Nath

What can one do in 72 hours? Write a lot of words? Perhaps you have 30K words left to write? Or perhaps you came to know about NaNoWriMo today and are wondering if you can do the 50K words in 72 hours? Shatrujeet Nath, well-known author of The Karachi Deception, and the The Guardians of the Halahala and The Conspiracy at Meru, the first two books in the Vikramaditya Veergatha series, tells you how it is done.

Over to Shatrujeet Nath, then:

A young Buddhist monk, journeying home from his monastery, took an unfamiliar road in the hope that it would get him home faster. His path, however, soon brought him to the banks of a deep and wide river, boiling with rapids. The monk stared in despair at the seemingly impassable obstacle barring his path, wondering how he would battle the raging currents and get to the other side.

He was on the verge of giving up his journey and backtracking when he noticed a famous Zen Master walking on the opposite bank of the river. The young monk hollered over the noise of the river’s churning waters to make himself heard. “Oh wise one, can you tell me how to get to the other side of this river?”

The Zen Master stopped and looked at the youngster who had hailed him. Then, pondering for a moment, he looked up and down the river bank. At last, he cupped his hands around his mouth and shouted back, “My son, you are already on the other side.”

Often, when we are in the midst of a pursuit of our own, we come across our own personal ‘impassable rivers’, and we struggle to find a way to the other side. The prospect of crossing over and completing the journey seems so bleak and daunting that we are even willing to forego the journey and turn back.

But, as the Zen Master so rightly pointed out, we are all already on the other side; it is just that we are so intimidated with what lies ahead of us that we discount the value of everything that we have put behind us in our journey.

To use another Zen example, a master and his young pupil are climbing up a steep mountainside. The climb gets more and more arduous higher they go, till they reach a point from where the last mile to the mountaintop is bare rock. The pupil throws up his hands and tell his master that he is prepared to give up on that last one mile that will take him to the peak. The master tells the pupil to turn around and look down into the valley from where they have ascended.

Pointing, he tells the pupil, “You are not giving up on the last one mile. You are giving up on the 20 miles that you walked to bring you here. You are giving up on that stream whose cool, clear waters refreshed you on the way up. You are giving up on that great tree that shaded you from the noonday heat. You are giving up on this gentle path that made it easier for you to walk. You are giving up on your faith that has carried you so far up the mountain.”

We all make ourselves a promise and get into a contract when we set out to do something. There is so much of ourselves that we then put into what we want to achieve and make happen. Throwing all away after having come so far is the greatest injustice we could do ourselves. It is just so much easier to persevere a little more, stay the course.

As the Zen Master said, we only have to realize that we already are on the other side.

 

About Shatrujeet Nath:

:Shatrujeet Nath

Door-to-door salesman, copywriter, business journalist & assistant editor at The Economic Times; Shatrujeet Nath was all this before he took to writing fiction full-time. He debuted with The Karachi Deception in 2013, followed by The Guardians of the Halahala and The Conspiracy at Meru, the first two books in the Vikramaditya Veergatha series. At present, he is writing volume three of the series, and is also scripting an ambitious Bollywood movie project for a large, Mumbai-based production house. Shatrujeet lives in Mumbai, but spends much of his time in the fantasy worlds of his stories. He can also be found at facebook.com/Shatrujeet Nath and @shatrujeet.

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Krishna Udayasankar

Empower Yourself: A peptalk by Krishna Udayasankar

As NaNoWriMo 2016 begins, we at Wrimo India are always excited to read the peptalks from our beloved writers from India. We have a very fine lineup of writers this year too, and they will be cheering wrimos forward with their words of encouragement and motivation. Today, we have with us, Krishna Udayasankar, author of the well-known Aryavarta Chronicles and her latest book, Immortal. Over to Krishna, then 🙂

Let your choice empower you – Krishna Udayasankar

Congrats on signing up for this year’s #NanoWriMo. Now let me tell you a secret: I’m actually a bit in awe of you.

You see, the toughest part of writing a book is deciding to do it. I’m a six-books-and-counting author, but even now the beginning of a new manuscript feels like a mix of lifting a gigantic mountain,getting undressed in public and fighting off a really mean monster, all at the same time.

There’s the practical side of it; the sheer effort, the discipline required, the juggling a gazillion things in daily life, be it a job, kids, a household or health or…anything really. What sane person would add one more thing to their “to-do list,” and that too out of choice?

Then there’s the emotional side of it, the fear and uncertainty – a universe of what-if’s that make it so much easier to not open the Pandora’s box called “writing.”

You see, the toughest part of writing a book is deciding to do it!

What if I can’t finish? What if it sucks? What if I don’t find a publisher. What if I’m published but my book doesn’t sell?And let’s not forget that ultimate mean monster – call it time-sink, call it writer’s block, or call it simple blankness but it’s there… that state of wanting to make words on paper (or on a computer screen) but helplessly unable to do so.

I could tell you that every writer faces these problems and they never really go away no matter how much one has written or published, but I’m guessing you want to kill me right about now. Before you do, hear me out:

This sucks. This is illogical. This is painful.

The fact is, this is as good as it gets. It really, really doesn’t get better or easier than this. This sucks. This is illogical. This is painful.

And yet, here were are.

That right there, is the key. You’ve probably figured this next bit out, but sometimes it’s good to be reminded of why we do what we do.

We write because…we must!

We write, sometimes because we want to. But mostly, we write because the alternative – to not write – would… well, it might not destroy us, but it would come pretty close. But that’s the last thing we want to admit, to the world or even to ourselves. But we write because we must, and that is a very, very powerful thing.

They say history is made by those who show up, and you have shown up, you’ve decided to write, to do this, even though there may be many reasons not to. You have made a choice, a decision. You’ve signed up for #NaNoWriMo. Recognize that, acknowledge it and use it to empower yourself.

There may be days when you don’t make your word count, there may be days when you think of giving up. On those days, remember that fiery feeling in your belly that brought you here, even though it seemed to be the craziest place to be. The good news (finally), is that the problems don’t go away, but neither does the euphoria, the sheer thrill, joy, ecstasy – whatever it is you get – of writing.

You are here. From this point on, it doesn’t matter what you produce, how much you produce, whether it’s the best literature ever or a rocking-good action thriller or anything really. You are here. You’re a writer.

Have a great #NaNoWriMo and may the muse always be with you!

Warm wishes,
Krishna Udayasankar

(All pics kind courtesy: Krishna Udayasankar)

 

ABOUT KRISHNA UDAYASANKAR:

Krishna Udayasankar

Krishna Udayasankar’s bestselling debut series of mytho-historical novels, The Aryavarta Chronicles (Govinda, Kaurava and Kurukshetra; Hachette 2012, 2013, 2014) have received critical acclaim. She is also the author of Three, a novel based on the myths and legends surrounding the founding of Singapore; Objects of Affection, a full-length collection of poetry (Math Paper Press, 2013); an editor of Body Boundaries: The Etiquette Anthology of Women’s Writing (The Literary Centre, 2013). Her latest novel is Immortal – a contemporary fantasy-adventure novel that is “part American Gods, part Indiana Jones.” She is also the current Writer-in-Residence at Fort Canning National Park, Singapore, and her short fiction and poetry also feature in many print and online anthologies.

Krishna holds an undergraduate degree in law and a PhD in strategic management. She lives in Singapore with her family, which includes three bookish canine-children, Boozo, Zana and Maya, who are sometimes to be found at her laptop, trying to make her writing better.

Grab your copy of Govinda, Kaurava and Kurukshetra, here, here, and here respectively.
Immortal is available here.